Posts Tagged ‘Sierra College’

Sierra STEM Teachers Apply Critical Thinking

Tuesday, July 16th, 2013

DSC00666The Sierra College STEM Collaborative with Northwestern Searle Center for Advancing Learning and Teaching has developed a one-of-a-kind professional development program to train college and high school faculty to teach applied critical thinking and better prepare students for employment. The first professional development session was held in June 2013.

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Weld Expo at Sierra College Saturday, April 27

Wednesday, April 24th, 2013

 Discover your passion for welding, see the latest welding equipment, talk with experts, try welding, enroll in TIG or MIG advanced seminars, check out virtual welding, meet faculty and students, see pipe welding demonstrations and so much more at Weld Expo at Sierra College on Saturday, April 27, 2013 from 9 am to 4 pm. Free admission and free parking.

Learn more: http://sierraschoolworks.com/section/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/96-Sparks-will-fly-at-Sierra-College-Weld-Expo-’13.jpg

 


Girls Explore Nontraditional Employment for Women (NEW) at Sierra College

Tuesday, April 16th, 2013

On Friday, April 19, at the NEW Event, high school girls, in groups of less than 10, will meet Sierra College faculty, create a project and learn about careers that are nontraditional for women such as welding, mechatronics, automotive and drafting.

This intimate NEW event will give girls a welcoming introduction to a technical education path at Sierra College. They will see labs, use tools, build projects, meet female college students and learn about careers. The event is designed to connect with girls and inspire their career plans.

At the Sierra College Nontraditional Employment for Women (NEW) Event expect:

  • Girls doing hands-on projects using power and hand-tools in college labs.
  • Students using diagnostic equipment to troubleshoot basic mechanical issues on a car.
  • Women designing with 3D software and seeing 3D printing or additive manufacturing.
  • Females learning basic fabrication skills to make their own metal flower vase.
  • Girls interacting with faculty and college students at six different labs on campus.

Businesses seek more employees in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM). Women are underrepresented in these fields. Attracting female students to technical careers will help supply workers needed to maintain a global competitiveness and provide living wage employment to women.

 


Sierra College Auto Student wins Soroptimist Award

Tuesday, March 12th, 2013

Congratualtions to Sierra College students, Kathryn Potts who won the Women’s Opportunity Award from Soroptimist International Loomis Basin.

Potts plans to become an automotive technician or an automotive service writer. “I have always liked fixing thing and seeing how they work,” said Potts. “By working in this traditionally male field, I will be able to make a great life for my kids.”

Several Loomis Basin School District teachers also won grants at the ceremony in Loomis on February 27 to enhance thier mathematics programs:

Susan McQueen, 6th grade math and science teacher at Loomis Grammar School, received a grant to buy a supplemental math program that uses visual and kinesthetic approaches to provide students with a foundation for success with algebra.

Top LtoR: Patricia Sleizer; Susan McQueen; Tracey Curry; Dana Swain; Bobbi Nelson; Bottom LtoR Jennifer Ameigeiras; Amanda Tibbitts; Angela Smith

Tracey Curry, 1st grade teacher at Ophir Elementary School, was given an award to purchase tactile manipulative kits that can be used by students to reinforce and practice key first grade math concepts.

Dana Swain, 4th grade teacher at Placer School, received a grant for a banking project to enhance both math and history curricula. This program will reinforce the concept of decimals while working with money, and teach students about banking services, financial institutions and how money impacts us every day as a cornerstone of our economy.

Learn more at the Loomis News Soroptimist awards make a difference — Teachers, community members receive grants and awards.


Ski Resort Lifts Awareness of Applied Math for STEM Careers

Saturday, March 9th, 2013

Northstar California Resort gave college faculty a behind the scenes tour of the lift maintence operations so they could gain applied math examples to use in their classrooms. The one day externship was funded by the Sierra College Science,
Technology Engineering and Math (STEM) Collaborative.

“Teachers can use simple geometry to demonstrate calculating the angle of the chair suspended from the cable carrying it up the hill,” said Katie Lucero, Math Department Chair, Sierra College. “We saw how data was collected and logged daily; basic math computations were used to confirm that the system is running within safety parameters. A much more complicated series of equations would be used by engineers in the design process to determine the weight per chair for the lift system, with and without people, when it is stopped and when it is moving at maximum speed.”

Learn more at Rocklin and Roseville Today Faculty tour Northstar to Apply Math to Jobs.

 


Sac Bee: Mechatronics students find STEM jobs

Tuesday, February 12th, 2013

In the February 12, Sacramento Bee article, Mechanical teacher has many busy grads, Cathie Anderson reports that Sierra College students in the Mechatronics program are finding excellent career opportunities in a variety of STEM businesses. She writes:

“Sierra’s program is one of only about 10 in the nation, Halbern says, and it stands virtually alone when it comes to placing students in such a range of industries.

They can work on machines that build wafers, on the equipment that puts a ring just within an acrobat’s grasp, on locomotive controls, ski lifts, automobiles, traffic lights, ATMs, escalators, elevators, self-checkout kiosks, gas pumps….” Read more of the article at the Sac Bee: http://www.sacbee.com/2013/02/12/5183023/cathie-anderson-mechanical-teacher.html#storylink=cpy

Students can learn more about opportunities in Mechatronics by watching this movie – Sierra College Mechatronics: STUDENTS Learn Real Skills for Real Jobs or going to www.realskillsrealjobs.com.

Through the Sierra STEM Collaborative, the Sierra College Mechatronics faculty have been very helpful to local high school programs that prepare students for STEM education and careers.


Colfax Project Amplifies Interest in STEM Careers

Wednesday, January 23rd, 2013

Colfax students display their team's amplifiers in Tech Essentials for Freshmen

Christian Kinsey, Terry O’Keefe and Wade Wolff, Colfax High School Tech Essentials Instructors, developed a new student project this year – an amplifier –that appeals to both boys and girls. The Freshmen Design Tech students can easily plug in their ipods in to the amplifier and listen to music.

The amplifier was designed in 3D software and made with hand tools, a vacuum former and a soldering iron. Students then customized the design of their ‘skin’ using design software and a vinyl printer/cutter.

Students also used Career Cruising to assess their interests, and researched two colleges where they might apply to pursue education after high school. For instance, they might be intersted in Welding, Mechatronics, Engineering, Energy Technology or Drafting & Engineering Support at Sierra College. The Sierra College STEM Collaborative grant provided access to Career Cruising and some of the design and fabrication tools. In addition, the students took the Kiersey Temperament test to discover their personality strengths and challenges, and learning style preferences.

Students also developed their own digital portfolios, which will follow them after they graduate.Working in teams, students developed a marketing video and branding materials, and prepared a seven-minute presentation that was delivered three times to ‘judges’ attending the event on Friday, December 21. Students used digital technology (the ipad) to demonstrate their portfolios which include their four-year plans, examples of their coursework, resumes, and the amplifier fabrication process. Judges filled out a plus/delta evaluation following each team presentation, and voted on overall best table design, best video and best ‘skin’ design.

The team presentations were really outstanding! All of the ninth grade students were excited – and proud – of their projects,” said Carol Pepper-Kittredge, Director, Center for Applied Competitive Technologies, Sierra College and one of the community judges who listened to the students’ presentations. Colfax students display their team’s amplifiers in Tech Essentials for Freshmen


NSF grant demonstrates how to teach applied math

Saturday, December 8th, 2012

The National Science Foundation (NSF) funded a grant that enabled Sierra College to develop a model for teaching applied math while fabricating a catapult project called Tech-Explorer (www.tech-explorer.com).  Findings showed that using hands-on projects, connected to authentic work situations, improves teaching of mathematics. Watch the Tech-Explorer movie on how Sierra College integrated math instruction with a catapult building project.  The Sierra College Center for Applied Competitive Technologies (CACT) received NSF Advanced Technological Education grant #1003259 for $150,000.

A total of 306 students built catapults using mills, lathes, drills and other industrial tools. Then the students captured speed, distance, and height of a launched ball during a competition and used the data in a parabolic equation to determine the best launch angle. In addition, 32 teachers participated in three workshops on using hands-on math projects in the classroom.

According to the project principle investigator, Sandra Scott, integrating practical application into math classes and math into technical classes is imperative. “Students really responded when they realized that the parabolic curve is used in headlights, snowboards and solar collectors,” said Scott. “We need to show students how math is applied.”

The Sierra College Tech-Explorer catapult project has been adopted at College of the Canyons, College of the Sequoias, and San Bernardino Community College. The Regional Center for Advanced Manufacturing’s Advanced Manufacturing in Tennessee used it at a camp for 8-9th graders. Nebraska’s Columbus Public Schools incorporated Tech-Explorer into SHINE, a NSF funded program.

Learn more about Sierra College NSF Tech-Explorer.

 


STEM Faculty Integrate Math Lessons into Welding

Tuesday, December 4th, 2012

Through a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant,  Sierra College Math and Welding  faculty participated in the University of West Virginia at Parkersburg (UWVP) IGNITE project to develop math lessons applied to a welding project. The results showed that students’ math skills improved significantly.

Watch the movie about this NSF project integrating math into a welding technical education class at Placer Herald Sierra College addresses skills gap by fusing math with welding (11-29-2012).

Sierra College Welding Department chair, Bill Wenzel and Katie Lucero, chair of the Sierra College Math Department, developed the new applied academic curriculum. Carol Pepper-Kittredge, director, Sierra College Center for Applied Competitive Technologies (CACT), facilitated the collaboration of faculty with the University of West Virginia on this NSF grant project.

See the photo gallery of Sierra College welding students learning applied math as part of the NSF grant at the Placer Herald Sierra College fuses math and welding

 


Placer High School students learn Mechatronics skills

Monday, November 26th, 2012

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Placer High School Mechatronics program students in Auburn built robots using the motors supplied by the Sierra STEM Collaborative. The Mechatronics teacher, James Anderson, said that as a result of this project, he “saw several kids really getting excited.”